Holocaust

Content type
Collection
Broad City Lost and Found

The 8 Best Jewish Quotes from Broad City’s “Lost and Found”

by Larisa Klebe

A curated list of the eight best Jewish quotes from Season 5, Episode 6 of Broad City.

Justice Rosalie Silberman Abella, 1983

Rosalie Silberman Abella: The Canadian RBG

by Nina Baran

In my opinion, Abella has demonstrated intersectional feminism through her work as a legal advocate and supporter of civil rights for marginalized communities. Before her appointment to the bench, Abella was considered one of Canada's foremost human rights lawyers.

Hannah Downing's Extended Family

Photographic Memory

by Hannah Downing

I never paid much attention to our history when I was younger. I felt very disconnected from my Jewish past, as I had little grasp of what the Holocaust really was and what it meant to be Jewish, especially growing up in an area with few Jews.

Topics: Family, Holocaust
Anti-Semitic Graffiti

May the Faith Be With You

by Emma Nathanson

Because I didn’t have support, because I felt alone, I didn’t confront my teacher about his words that day or about the lack of Holocaust education. I didn’t take a stand, either, when I found the words “JEW HUNTER” scrawled on the leg of a desk. Nor did I speak up when I found the same horrifying phrase on a different desk a few weeks later.

Clash of Clans

The Art of Attack

by Ilana Jacobs

Video games are inherently sexist. I’ve accepted this fact as true and immutable ever since I began playing multiplayer games. From the way they’re marketed towards boys and the sexist character designs, to the anonymous players’ offensive language, everything about video games seems to scream at me: YOU ARE NOT MEANT TO BE HERE!

Topics: Holocaust

Rachael Cerrotti

Rachael Cerrotti is a documentary photographer, writer and educator. Her storytelling focuses on narratives of resilience with a unique interest in family history. For nearly a decade, Rachael has been pursuing her long-term project, Follow My Footprints, retracing her grandmother's route of displacement during and in the wake of World War II. She is now writing a book about this journey and regularly speaks in communities and classrooms across the country and abroad.

Everything is Illuminated Book Cover

Everything Is…Complicated

by Shira Small

I love reading Jewish literature. Seeing my culture and experience come to life on the pages of a book can be meaningful and validating; it makes my idiosyncratic religious practices feel normal, and real. The representation and recognition of Judaism in popular culture is crucial, but what do you do when the author gets it wrong? 

Topics: Holocaust, Fiction

Lonka Korzybrodska

Lonka Korzybrodska’s bravery, charm, and genius for languages meant that she could trick Germans and Poles into transporting all manner of goods for the Jewish resistance during the Holocaust.

Rozka Korczak-Marla

Rozka Korczak-Marla was one of three leaders of the Vilna Ghetto uprising, which, astonishingly, ended with successful escapes rather than mass executions.

Sarah Kofman

Philosopher Sarah Kofman argued that the ideas of great thinkers couldn’t simply be taken on their abstract merit, they had to be considered in the context of those philosophers’ lives.

Reizia Cohen Klingberg

Although Reizia Cohen Klingberg had never been political, the Nazi invasion of Poland inspired her to risk her life as a freedom fighter.

Vitka Kempner-Kovner

Zionist Vitka Kempner-Kovner helped found the United Partisan Organization (FPO) in the Vilna Ghetto and struck a blow for freedom by blowing up a Nazi train.

Agnes Keleti

A promising gymnast, Agnes Keleti survived the Nazi invasion of Hungary and won the most medals of any athlete at the 1956 Summer Olympics.

Hannah Karminski

When the Nazi regime dissolved the feminist organization to which Hannah Karminski had devoted her life, she found new ways to serve the German Jewish community by saving children and providing aid for families.
Rising Voices Fellow Isabel Kirsch and her Grandmother

L'Dor Vador: Lessons from my Grandmother

by Isabel Kirsch

My grandmother, Marguerite, was born in Paris in 1937 to Polish parents, Fania and Adam. Shortly after her birth, the family moved to Jarnac, a tiny village in southwestern France. The family was Jewish, though they were not observant. Regardless, after the fall of the Third Republic in 1940, it became dangerous for them to even speak of their religion. 

Topics: Holocaust, Medicine

The First Woman Rabbi: Uncovering the Story of Regina Jonas

Join JWA Rabbinic Intern Sarah Mulhern as she leads participants in a discussion about the little-known story of Regina Jonas: the first woman rabbi, and a Holocaust victim. Learn about the variety of materials and resources that JWA has to offer on this influential figure, and think more broadly about which stories we tell and which we do not, why this is, and what impacts this has on us and our communities.

Etty Hillesum

Like Anne Frank, Etty Hillesum kept a diary poetically describing her life under Nazi rule, but her open discussion of her spiritual and sexual exploration prevented it from being published until 1981.

Judith Herzberg

Judith Herzberg has been hailed as one of the greatest living Dutch poets for her ability to imbue everyday objects with unexpected meaning.

Anna Braude Heller

A brilliant pediatrician used to working in difficult circumstances, Anna Braude Heller struggled to keep children’s hospitals open through both WWI and WWII.

Bela Ya’ari Hazan

Bela Ya’ari Hazan showed great courage as a combat instructor and courier for the Resistance during WWII.

Michal Govrin

As the child of a Holocaust survivor, Michal Govrin has used her writing to open a broader conversation about the enduring legacy of the Holocaust.
Statue of Jewish Refugees in Shanghai

China's Jewish Sanctuary City

by Emily Cataneo

I should be able to tour the neighborhoods that sheltered hundreds of thousands of Jewish refugees in New York, Chicago, Boston, Montreal and Toronto, London and Manchester. But thanks to xenophobia, inaction, and fear, these neighborhoods never existed.

Karen Gershon

From early childhood, poet Karen Gershon expected to settle in Israel, but the chaos of WWII sent her in an entirely different direction.

Gisi Fleischmann

Despite multiple opportunities to flee to Palestine, Gisi Fischer Feischmann chose to work within the system in Nazi-held Europe to save as many Jews as she could.

Paulette Weil Oppert Fink

Paulette Weill Oppert Fink joined the French Resistance to fight the Nazis, but her work to save refugees didn’t end with the war.
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