Military

Content type
Collection
Dahlia "Pobie" Johnston

The Unsung Jewish Women of WWII

by Toshe Cecev

It is the accomplishments of everyday women that shape our world and change our collective future. Let’s tell their stories, too.

Julie Schwartz

Julie Schwartz’s decision to become the first woman rabbi to serve as an active duty chaplain in the US Military broadened women’s roles in Jewish and civic leadership.

Vitka Kempner-Kovner

Zionist Vitka Kempner-Kovner helped found the United Partisan Organization (FPO) in the Vilna Ghetto and struck a blow for freedom by blowing up a Nazi train.

Julie Schwartz

Julie Schwartz broke new ground as the first woman rabbi to serve as an active duty chaplain in the US Military.
Trans Soldier Erez Shachar (media object)

Trans Bodies are Human Bodies

by Emily Cataneo

Trump et al seem to believe that there exists a template for a default American. A normal American, if you will. Surprise, surprise: that American is a white, able cis man.

Topics: Law, Military

Dafna Nundi Izraeli

Dafna Nundi Gewurtz Izraeli examined Israeli society through the lens of gender studies, showing how sexism in the Israeli army had wider repercussions for gender inequality in Israeli businesses and politics.

Shulamit Goldstein

While Shulamit Goldstein is distinguished as Israel’s first female pilot, the arc of her long life echoes the changes in Israeli society.

Amy Sheridan

Although American women had flown planes in WWII as civilians, Amy Sheridan helped open the skies to a new generation of women as the first Jewish woman to become an aviator in the US Armed Services.

Ethel Shilmover Grossman

While serving as a member of the Army Nurse Corps in WWII, Ethel Shilmover Grossman was moved and astonished to see the kindness with which American soldiers treated wounded German POWs.

Clara Raven

After a distinguished military career as one of the first female doctors to serve in WWII, Clara Raven went on to do pioneering research on Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

Tamar Eshel

A lifelong diplomat with a strong record of defending women’s rights and human rights, Tamar Eshel capped her career with two terms as a member of the Knesset from 1977–1984.

Dalia Dorner

Dalia Dorner’s early commitment to human rights shaped her decade of service as an Israel Supreme Court Justice.

Ruby Daniel

Ruby Daniel’s memoir of her life in India revealed not only the rich culture of her childhood but also her experiences as a Jewish woman in the Indian Navy, serving alongside Muslim and Hindu men.

Amanda Simpson

A skilled pilot and aeronautics engineer, Amanda Simpson made history in 2010 when she became the first openly transgender presidential appointee, as senior technical advisor to the Bureau of Industry and Security.
New Year Postcard

Propelled into the New Year

by Deborah Rubin Fields

Early in the 20th century, Jewish New Year card manufacturers began embellishing their cards with airplanes. They did so for three interrelated reasons: to call attention to the thrilling, modern invention of the airplane, to draw an analogy between the New Year and this new means of travel, and to use the airplane to highlight the changing status of women.

Yehudith Birk

Yehudith Birk’s investigations into the protein structures of legumes like soy and chickpeas led to vital discoveries about both the nutritional value of legumes and their potential for combatting certain cancers.

Netiva Ben Yehuda

Although she began her writing career very late in life, Netiva Ben Yehuda transformed the Israeli literary scene with her explosive Palmah trilogy.

Ruth Arnon

Immunologist Ruth Arnon and her long-time collaborator Michael Sela made unprecedented breakthroughs when they developed the first synthetic antigen and the first drug approved for treating multiple sclerosis, Copaxone.

Tosia Altman

Tosia Altman volunteered as a courier and weapons smuggler, risking her life through some of the worst conflicts of the Jewish uprising during the Holocaust.

Hedva Almog

As commanding officer of the Israeli Army’s Women’s Corps, Hedva Almog created training programs and promotion opportunities for female officers, working to create a better environment for the women who followed her.

Sarah Aaronsohn

A spy for the Nili ring, Sarah Aaronsohn fought to free Palestine from Turkish rule and withstood torture for her ideals.

Frances Hart Sheftall

When her husband and son were captured by the British, Frances Hart Sheftall managed to earn money and raise her family alone through bouts of yellow fever, a smallpox epidemic, and the upheaval of the Revolutionary War.

Long-lost poem by war heroine Hannah Szenes is found.

September 2, 2012

A poem by WWII hero Hannah Szenes was discovered 68 years after her death.

Death of Soviet spy Ruth Werner

July 7, 2000

"I fought against fascism.  Whatever else, I can hold my head up high because of that." - Ruth Werner, Soviet spy

Evangelyn Barsky

One of the first two women allowed to pass the bar in Delaware, Evangelyn Barsky made a great impact on her community in her brief career.
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