This website is made possible by generous donations from users like you. $18 helps keep JWA online for one day. Please consider making a gift before our June 30 fiscal year end. Thank you!

Close [x]

Show [+]

Publishing

Content type
Collection

Alice Shalvi

Alice Shalvi created opportunities for Israeli women and girls, offering Talmud study to Orthodox girls and spearheading legislative reforms for women’s employment.

Jenny Hirsch

Jenny Hirsch devoted years to a society for women’s employment, but when the organization ironically refused to pay her, she reinvented herself as a mystery writer.

Bracha Habas

One of the few women journalists to work in Israel before the founding of the state, Bracha Habas became beloved for her work as a writer and editor of children’s literature.

Amy Gottlieb

In her novel The Beautiful Possible, Amy Gottlieb melds the everyday and the mystic by showing the secret lives and troubled pasts of rabbis, scholars, and their loved ones.

Eugenie Foa

Eugénie Foa, the first professional Jewish woman writer, described Jewish culture in sympathetic terms to a broader audience.
Reading is Sexy

Slut Lit: The Literary Feminist's Friend or Foe?

by Emily Cataneo

The Bed Moved, a new short story collection by Rebecca Schiff, features 23 stories with young female narrators.

Topics: Publishing
Banned Books Logo

JWA Round Up: Banned Books

by Bella Book

In our current political climate, the First Amendment can sometimes become a catchphrase for those looking for the license to say hateful things under the guise of patriotism. This shallow understanding of the First Amendment excludes the deeper truth behind the freedom of speech: everyone has a right to information, free of censorship or agenda. Jewish First Amendment advocate Judith Krug and libraries around the country, knew in 1982 when Banned Books Week was established that reading stories can empower, uplift, and radically change how people perceive themselves and others.

#1000BlackGirlBooks

This Black History Month, A Call for Diversity in Children’s Books

by  Kate Rafey

Much like my current life, my childhood was filled with books. I could never get enough of traveling into different worlds and times, and making friends with fictional characters that at times appeared more real than reality.

Letty Cottin Pogrebin / Debbie Stoller

Magazine Founders

Making Change Through Media

Debbie Stoller

Debbie Stoller has been hailed as a pioneer of “girlie feminism” for reviving interest in traditionally feminine activities like knitting through Bust and Stitch ‘n Bitch.

Rachel Sassoon Beer

Rachel Sassoon Beer rose to fame as owner and editor of both The Observer and The Sunday Times, making her the first woman to edit a national newspaper.

Zsofia Balla

Zsófia Balla persisted in her craft despite government censorship, becoming a celebrated poet in both Romania and Hungary.
"The Feminine Mystique," by Betty Friedan

The Feminine Mystique: Betty Friedan, A Generation of Readers, and You

by Tara Metal

The story of The Feminine Mystique is of course the story of Betty Friedan, but it is also the story of every woman, young and old, who read the book and came away from it a changed person. This week, we celebrate the anniversary of its landmark publication in 1963, and its profound impact on the budding feminist movement of the time, as well as on subsequent generations of readers.

Topics: Feminism, Publishing

Rosika Schwimmer

Rosika Schwimmer’s uncompromising vision of women’s equality and world peace helped advance the women’s movement but caused a backlash that cost Schwimmer everything.

Grace Schulman

Grace Schulman’s poetry compresses time and space, merging the past and present and exploring the mysteries of religion.

Eva Schocken

As the daughter of Salman Schocken, founder of Schocken Books, Eva Schocken pushed the publishing company to the forefront of both education and women’s studies.

Dorothy Schiff

Dorothy Schiff led many lives, from debutante to social reformer, but she is best remembered as the publisher of the New York Post, the first woman to run a New York newspaper.

Sallyann Amdur Sack

Sallyann Amdur Sack has often been called the godmother of Jewish genealogy for creating the resources that have allowed Jews to research their heritage.

Laura Riding

Laura Riding was as known in literary circles for her tumultuous personal life as for her exceptional poetry, regularly changing her name to mark transformative moments in her life.

Karen Berger

As executive editor for DC Comics’ Vertigo imprint, Karen Berger helped change the tone of mainstream comics, championing complex, challenging stories like Neil Gaiman’s Sandman and Alan Moore’s V for Vendetta.

Jenette Kahn

Jenette Kahn rebranded National Periodical Publications as DC Comics, reviving the failing company as a proving ground for both experimental titles and reboots of iconic characters like Batman and Superman.

Yocheved Herschlag Muffs

Over the course of thirty–six years working for the Anti–Defamation League, Yocheved Herschlag Muffs challenged inaccurate depictions of Jews in dozens of major textbooks and reference books, helping to reshape attitudes towards Jews.
Tara Metal Reads "The Boston Girl"

Announcing the JWA Book Club

by Tara Metal

Chances are, no two people reading this post have the same favorite book. From month to month, I don’t even have the same favorite book—my tastes range from nonfiction crime thrillers to mid-century poetry, and hit quite a few unusual notes in between. I seek out novels I can get lost in. I like all kinds of mythology and the occasional graphic novel. Choosing what to read next can be overwhelming and generally, I need a little guidance.

2014 Fireworks

Top Ten Moments For Jewish Women In 2014

by  Judith Rosenbaum

I’ve already expressed my feelings on the whole “year of the Jewish woman” thing, but that’s not to say we shouldn’t celebrate the many great moments for Jewish women in 2014. Here, in no particular order, are a few of our favorites at JWA.

Linda Rosenberg Miller

Unsatisfied with the traditional pursuits of married women of her day, Linda Rosenberg Miller devoted herself to Jewish studies and collecting art and archeological treasures.
Subscribe to Publishing

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

Get JWA in your inbox