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Painting

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Collection
"Judith Slaying Holofernes" by Artemisia Gentileschi, circa 1614-20 (cropped).

Loving Judith

by Justine Orlovsky-Schnitzler

Gentileschi’s rendition of Judith is a self-portrait—allowing her to wield a sword and take revenge, if only in fantasy. Judith Slaying Holofernes was the first piece of feminist art that really moved me. Even now, I get chills when I view it. I thought a lot about Judith this week, after dusting off my menorah and dutifully buying candles and gelt.

Market at Minho by Sonia Delaunay, 1915

The Art of Gender Representation

by Sofia Heller

The words to SZA’s “Drew Barrymore” ring in my ears as I write this; the song serves as an anthem for the teen angst and insecurities I’ve been feeling since I got home from school today. Feeling lonely, feeling like I’m not living up to the standard of female beauty: SZA articulates the thoughts that have been running through my mind.

Topics: Painting, Music
Portrait of Elisa Klapheck by Marlis Glaser

Painting Courage and Painting History

by Abby Richmond

Marlis Glaser, a German artist, grew up in rural Germany, not knowing any Jews or her father’s previous involvement with the Nazi party. Glaser was introduced to a German Jewish woman who had survived the Holocaust. Now, Glaser has shaped her art around Judaism, and recently converted. Her colorful work includes hundreds of portraits of Holocaust survivors, their families, and other Jewish figures throughout history.

Topics: Painting
Gloria Steinem and Linda Stein, Suited Up (cropped)

Diving into the Wreck with Linda Stein

by Bella Book

Imagine my surprise when I encountered the equivalent of an androgynous rubber suit embodied in the sculpture of artist/activist Linda Stein. Unlike Rich’s suit, which is confined to the page, Stein’s art is tangible. In fact, some of these sculptures are wearable.

Gluck

The gender nonconforming painter Gluck, who refused categorization in all things, was known for her spare, evocative paintings of flowers, prizefighters, landscapes, and even rotting fish.

Broncia Koller-Pinell

Resisting the idea that serious artists were single, poor, and above all, male, expressionist painter Broncia Koller-Pinell insisted her work be taken on its merits.

Hedda Sterne Protests the “Monster National Exhibition.”

May 20, 1950
“I never thought in terms of a career, but I worked with tremendous urgency." - Artist Hedda Sterne

Adele Bloch-Bauer

A wealthy socialite and salon hostess in her day, Adele Bloch-Bauer became the center of an historic legal case when her niece demanded the return of her portrait, stolen by the Nazis.

Tina Blau

Inspired by Dutch masters and by the quality of light she found in the natural world on trips to Holland and Italy, Tina Blau became the only Jewish woman artist of her generation to be recognized by her peers.

Felicie Bernstein

Felicie Rosenthal Bernstein was as famed for her salons as for her art collection, both of which helped bring an appreciation for modern art to Berlin’s high society.
Elizabeth Stahl Holding Her Artwork

Three by Three: Making Art a Priority

by Julia Rubin
Clutching a tray of two teacups, Elizabeth leads me upstairs to the study. We sit next to a tall bookshelf and she reaches towards the far right, where thick volumes are bound in hues of navy, emerald, and charcoal, with titles like The Great Alone and Time and Tide.
Topics: Painting

Tatjana Barbakoff

The daughter of a Chinese mother and a Russian Jewish father, Tatjana Barbakoff used her mixed heritage as inspiration for stunning and innovative dance performances.

Sally Fox

Driven to document the real lives of women often ignored by male writers and historians, Sally Fox used photographs, paintings, and political cartoons to reveal the history of women at work and at play.

Ziva Amishai-Maisels

As an art historian and curator for Yad Vashem, Ziva Amishai-Maisels became known for her insights into the impact of the Holocaust on modern art.

Florine Stettheimer

Florine Stettheimer asked her sister Ettie to destroy her work after her death, but Ettie’s refusal saved dozens of Florine’s exquisite paintings and celebrated poems for the public to enjoy.

Nancy Spero

Rejecting postwar trends towards Pop art and abstract impressionism, figurative artist Nancy Spero instead drew inspiration from tribal totems in Chicago’s Field Museum.

Death of Susan Braun, dance archivist

October 3, 1995
Artist Susan Braun made an about-face in her career in the art world and began to fill the need of documenting dance on film.

Death of Seattle Artist and Activist Selma Waldman

April 17, 2008
“I am an artist . . . enamored of charcoal (the tool that does not lie) and the act of drawing." - Selma Waldman

Miriam Schapiro

Miriam Schapiro helped pioneer the feminist art movement, both through her own pushing of creative boundaries and by creating opportunities for other women artists.

Beyle Schaechter-Gottesman

Beyle Schaechter-Gottesman bridged the old world and the new as an award-winning modern writer of Yiddish poetry.

Doris Rosenthal

Doris Rosenthal’s artwork, inspired by her travels around the world, forged links between cultures and brought new aesthetics to design.

Colette Roberts

Colette Roberts helped shape our understanding of modern art both through her art criticism and through her unconventional teaching methods, bringing students into artists’ studios to talk with them about their work.

Lilli Palmer

Actress Lilli Palmer fled Nazi Germany to make a place for herself in Hollywood, but chose to return after the war, becoming celebrated once again in her home country.

Isadora Newman

Isadora Newman’s creativity defied categorization, spilling across the boundaries of poetry, fiction, painting, and playwriting, but always returned to the African American and Creole influences of her New Orleans heritage.

Birth of Victorian painter Rebecca Solomon

September 26, 1832

"That Rebecca Solomon was among the first Jewish women artists, if not the first, makes her career and artwork even more important.”

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