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Crafts

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Collection

Linda Stein

In crafting sculptures that incorporate concepts of weaponry, armor, and the female form, Linda Stein has found new ways to consider issues of power, violence, and protection.

Chloe Wise

Chloe Wise uses her art to comment on consumer culture, most famously through her Bread Bags series, which creates purses made of realistic-looking bakery items, adorned with the straps, logos, and hardware of designer bags.

Catherine Lieber Shimony

From American Jewish World Service to Global Goods Partners, Catherine Lieber Shimony has dedicated her career to international development, helping women across the globe develop the skills they need to better support their families and lead their communities.

Debbie Stoller

Debbie Stoller has been hailed as a pioneer of “girlie feminism” for reviving interest in traditionally feminine activities like knitting through Bust and Stitch ‘n Bitch.

Fania Mindell

After co-founding America’s first birth control clinic with Margaret Sanger in 1916, Fania Mindell was arrested and convicted of breaking the Comstock Act for her efforts to make birth control available to women.

Ziva Amishai-Maisels

As an art historian and curator for Yad Vashem, Ziva Amishai-Maisels became known for her insights into the impact of the Holocaust on modern art.

Ruth Amiran

Ruth Amiran led a number of major archaeological digs that uncovered details of daily life in Bronze-Age Israel as well as important clues into trade and political relationships between Israel and its near neighbors.

Julie Taymor

Julie Taymor’s bold, experimental style in directing plays and films has led to two Tonys (including the first Best Director Tony won by a woman) and an Emmy.

Florine Stettheimer

Florine Stettheimer asked her sister Ettie to destroy her work after her death, but Ettie’s refusal saved dozens of Florine’s exquisite paintings and celebrated poems for the public to enjoy.

Miriam Schapiro

Miriam Schapiro helped pioneer the feminist art movement, both through her own pushing of creative boundaries and by creating opportunities for other women artists.

Bertha Schaefer

Bertha Schaefer helped pioneer a new era in interior design, creating collaborations between architects, interior designers, and craftspeople to create new homes for the post-war era.

Gertrud Amon Natzler

Ceramicist Gertrud Amon Natzler and her husband Otto created thousands of stunning ceramics together, an exquisite collaboration that continued even after her death.

Lillian Nassau

Antique dealer Lillian Nassau rekindled the public’s enthusiasm for art deco and art nouveau at a time when Tiffany lamps were being destroyed for their bronze.

Ruth Leah Bunzel

Anthropologist Ruth Leah Bunzel did groundbreaking work on the relationship of artists to their work and on alcoholism in Guatemala and Mexico.

Judy Chicago

Judy Chicago vividly depicted women’s history and women’s experiences through sculpture, paintings, and installation art that involved hundreds of collaborators.

Beatrice Alexander

Beatrice Alexander's sharp business sense and her uncompromising attention to detail made her the most successful and best-loved doll manufacturer of her time.

Judy Chicago

It was obvious that birth was a universal human experience and one that is central to women's lives. Why were there no images?

Mae Rockland Tupa

Mae Rockland Tupa: Artist and Author

by  Keren R. McGinity, Ph.D.

The objects Mae made and the books she wrote helped shape the field of Jewish Americana. Mae’s work, taken as a whole, reflects her view that “just as Jews have become an integral part of the American scene, so can a classical American symbol be used to express a Jewish theme.” A shining example is her hannukiah titled “Miss Liberty”, which is emblazoned with the last lines of Emma Lazurus’s poem “The New Colossus,” and is in the permanent collection of the Jewish Museum in NYC.

Topics: Crafts, Non-Fiction
Shadow Box on the Life of Amelia “Zenia” Greszes by Alex Estroff, 2013

Jewish Women in Modern America: Lessons to Live By

by  Alex Estroff

Last semester, I was one of four boys in a course at The Weber School dedicated to Jewish women in modern America—a group of people who have had great impact on our lives. However, this group has received little of the public recognition it deserves and is vastly underrepresented in traditional history classes. Like most other American high school students, I have spent the bulk of my academic career studying Christian men from Europe. No wonder that I knew little or nothing about these remarkable women. Yet learning about them is only one reason why this course was so enlightening.

Topics: Crafts, Education
Adina Karpuj and her Grandmother, Esther Rebeca Leibowich de Bortz, circa 2011

“Thinking Inside the Box”: Framing My Grandmother’s Life

by  Adina Karpuj

I had never taken the time to learn much about my grandmother, Esther Rebeca Leibowich de Bortz’s past. While I knew that something in her history must have gone right—she became a renowned gynecologist in Argentina—large gaps existed between each of the detailed but disconnected anecdotes that she recounted to me over the years.

My grandmother—or Bobe as I call her—and I have never lived in the same country. She was born in Argentina and has lived there for her entire life, while I was born in Chile and have lived in Atlanta for most of mine. With each of her visits, I learn more about this woman I have always been taught to revere, but in truth never knew much about. Consequently, I welcomed the opportunity to take the course, “Jewish Women in Modern America,” at The Weber School in Atlanta, where I am a junior.

Topics: Crafts, Family

Sonia Delaunay, prolific artist, dies in Paris at 94

December 5, 1979

Sonia Delaunay (1885 – 1979) was in on the birth of several art movements—Dadaism, Surrealism, Cubism, Fauvism, Futurism.  She knew Picasso, Braque, Tzara, Diaghilev, and married the painter R

Isabella Karp in a Tallit by Miriam Karp

The story of creation: Artist Miriam Karp on making her daughter's bat mitzvah tallit

by  Leah Berkenwald

Miriam Karp is an artist who has been creating hundreds of one-of-a-kind ketubot since 1976.

Beatrice Alexander

"Madame" Beatrice Alexander knew how to dream big. Born into a world in which many women worked but few achieved prominence in business, she built her own company virtually singlehandedly. Raised amidst teeming poverty, she amassed a significant fortune. From the obscurity of an immigrant neighborhood, she became one of the foremost female entrepreneurs of the twentieth century.

Judith Leiber handbags featured in First Lady museum exhibit

March 22, 2005

Four handbags created for U.S. first ladies by Judith Leiber, luxury handbag doyenne, were featured in a New-York Historical Society exhibit that opened on March 22, 2005.

Opening of art exhibit of work by Holocaust survivor Daisy Brand

January 13, 2006

The University of Minnesota Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Northern Clay Center sponsored an exhibit of works by ceramicist Daisy Brand, which opened at the Center on January 13, 2006.

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