Social Science

Content type
Collection

Dafna Nundi Izraeli

Dafna Nundi Gewurtz Izraeli examined Israeli society through the lens of gender studies, showing how sexism in the Israeli army had wider repercussions for gender inequality in Israeli businesses and politics.

Mary Doria Russell

An experimental writer who often grapples with religion in her writing, Mary Doria Russell has found inspiration in historical events from WWII to the OK Corral.

Ruby Daniel

Ruby Daniel’s memoir of her life in India revealed not only the rich culture of her childhood but also her experiences as a Jewish woman in the Indian Navy, serving alongside Muslim and Hindu men.

Rokhl Auerbakh

Rokhl Auerbakh’s determination to record everything she witnessed in the Holocaust led to her creating the questionnaires to capture other survivors’ stories for war crime trials and Holocaust memorials.

Hanne Blank

Both as a historian and as a fiction writer, Hanne Blank has questioned how we relate to our bodies and our sexuality, from gender norms to fat-shaming.

Nechama Tec

Nechama Tec’s experiences as a child in the Holocaust led to her career highlighting nontraditional stories of the Holocaust, and inspired the movie Defiance.

Marjorie Shostak

Despite a lack of formal training as an anthropologist, Marjorie Shostak wrote one of the most popular life histories in the field, Nisa: The Life and Words of a !Kung Woman, in 1981.

Katya Gibel Mevorach

In her most famous book, Black, Jewish and Interracial: It’s Not the Color of Your Skin but the Race of Your Kin and Other Myths of Identity, anthropologist Katya Gibel Mevorach (nee Azoulay) explored identity politics, “passing” as white, and other social constructs of race.

Hortense Powdermaker

Anthropologist Hortense Powdermaker used her experiences of anti-Semitism and “passing” to offer new insights into how societies manage tensions between insiders and outsiders.

Jessica Blanche Peixotto

Jessica Blanche Peixotto defied convention and her family to become a respected authority in the field of economics.

Bernice L. Neugarten

A pioneer of the study of adult development and aging, Bernice Levin Neugarten found that there was no one right way for people to grow old.

Barbara Seaman / Miriam Perez

Women's Health Activists

Putting Women's Health in Their Own Hands

Ruth Schlossberg Landes

Ruth Schlossberg Landes made her mark as one of the first professional female anthropologists with her work on gender and religious identity in different cultures.

Gisela Peiper Konopka

Gisela Peiper Konopka ignored conventional wisdom and focused on what troubled teens had to say, a process that led to her becoming a pioneer of group therapy, rebuilding shattered German psyches after WWII.

Esther Loeb Kohn

Esther Loeb Kohn helped bridge the gap between Chicago’s volunteer and professional social workers and spent thirty years running the Hull House settlement whenever founder Jane Addams was away on her frequent travels.

C. Marian Kohn

Despite being legally blind from childhood due to cataracts, C. Marian Kohn worked tirelessly to help others in need, from orphans and immigrants to people with disabilities.

Dorothy C. Kahn

During the Depression, Dorothy C. Kahn helped pioneer social work as a service provided by the government to all who needed it, instead of the responsibility of just private or religious charities.

Ruth E. Fizdale

Ruth E. Fizdale helped transform social work from a charitable volunteer activity to a paid profession through her development of a fee-for-service, nonprofit counseling firm.

Barbara Myerhoff

Renowned anthropologist Barbara Myerhoff made waves when she chose to study a very different culture: her own.

Death of Ruth Fredman Cernea, cultural anthropologist of Jews in Myanmar and Washington, DC

March 31, 2009

Ruth Fredman Cernea said, "Jewish humor is not silly, but it is absurd absurdity. It is the opposite of deep seriousness."

Listen and Tell: Oral History Projects

Learn about tools and techniques that will make oral history projects more engaging for both you and your students. Get oriented to various online resources that will help you collect and share stories in your classroom or community. Finally, explore how oral histories can be used as “Jewish texts” that teach students about Jewish history, identity, and community.

Gertrude Wishnick Dubrovsky, 1926 - 2012

To the credit of the nuns, my Jewish search was encouraged, my questions were never cut short, and a patient effort was made consistently to answer me.

Adina Back, 1958 - 2008

While always ready to challenge Jewish convention when necessary, she also honored those traditions that didn’t need changing. Indeed, numerous friends across Adina’s wide community bake challah because Adina taught them—a tradition she learned from her own mother, Toby.

Suzanne Keller, 1927 - 2010

"Like 'The Man Who Came to Dinner,' I was the woman who came to Princeton."

Frances Feldman, 1912 - 2008

Frances Feldman's life and work are a testimony to the highest standards of social work scholarship. They reflect compassion, systematic understanding, and relentless curiosity. A pioneering spirit, personally and intellectually, she changed the world she lived in and left indelible memories with all who knew her.

Subscribe to Social Science

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

Get JWA in your inbox