Nora Glickman

Nora Glickman was born in La Pampa, Argentina. Her plays A Day in New York, Liturgies, Suburban News, A Certain Raquel and Two Charlottes are to be found in bilingual publications and have been performed worldwide. Her short stories are collected in Uno de sus Juanes, Mujeres, memorias, malogros and Puerta entre abierta. Glickman’s critical work, which centers on contemporary Latin American fiction, cinema, theatre and Jewish issues, includes The Jewish White Slave Trade and the Case of Raquel Liberman. She is associate editor of Modern Jewish Studies and is a professor of Spanish at Queens College and the Graduate Center, CUNY.

Articles by this author

Diana Raznovich

"Throughout her prolific career Raznovich explores the female role in its multiple manifestations. Her writings invite a kaleidoscopic reading. They are poetic, rather than ideological or anecdotal, and always iconoclastic."

Raquel Liberman

Raquel Liberman was born in Berdichev in the Ukraine on July 10, 1900. As a child, she emigrated with her family to Warsaw. On December 21, 1919 she married Yaacov Ferber, a tailor, in Warsaw, according to the Jewish rite. In l920 their first son, Joshua David Ferber, was born. A year later, while she was pregnant with her second child, Yaacov Ferber emigrated to Argentina alone, joining his married sister and brother-in-law in the small village of Tapalqué, in the province of Buenos Aires. By the time Raquel Ferber and her sons Joshua and Moshe Velvele (Mauricio) joined him in Buenos Aires on October 22, 1922, Yaacov was already suffering from tuberculosis. He died a few months later. In order to support her family and with no knowledge of Spanish, Raquel, aged twenty-three, found herself obliged to leave her children in her provincial village, under the care of trusted neighbors, and find work in the capital. Unable to makes ends meet from her work as a seamstress, she was either forced into or voluntarily entered prostitution. Facts and fiction about her actual dealings are blurred. What is undisputed, however, is that after a few years of practicing that trade, she tried unsuccessfully to leave it. After a second attempt she succeeded in publicly denouncing the Zwi Migdal, formerly called Varsovia, a Jewish organization named after its founder, Zwi Migdal, which engaged in the white slave trade.

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Nora Glickman." (Viewed on October 14, 2019) <https://qa.jwa.org/encyclopedia/author/glickman-nora>.

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