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Annette B. Vogt

Annette B. Vogt is a research scholar at the Max Planck Institute for History of Science in Berlin. She holds a Ph.D. in history of mathematics. Her research interests focus inter alia on women scientists in Europe from a comparative perspective.

Articles by this author

Margarete Zuelzer

Margarete Zuelzer’s life epitomizes both the successes and frustrations of women scientists in academia in the first half of the twentieth century. One of the first generation of women scientists in Germany and also one of the first to receive an appointment in a ministry of the Weimar Republic, she was forced to flee from Nazi Germany. Unable to find refuge, she was murdered in 1943.

Marguerite Wolff

Marguerite Wolff was an exception among women scholars in Germany in the first three decades of the twentieth century. Although she neither studied formally at any university nor received other scientific training, she built a scientific institute, the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Foreign Public Law and International Law, in Berlin. She not only herself became an expert in law, but also engaged in research and translation.

Estera Tenenbaum

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Lydia Rabinowitsch-Kempner

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Ursula Philip

Geneticist Ursula (Anna-Ursula) Philip began her professional career in Germany and, after fleeing into exile became a prominent researcher in Great Britain.

Lydia Pasternak

Lydia Pasternak was a chemist who was compelled to change her profession due to both marriage and second exile. Born and educated in Moscow, she studied in Berlin and worked in science in Munich, but after emigrating to Great Britain she became an outstanding translator of Russian poems.

Berta Ottenstein

The life and fate of Berta Ottenstein, a pioneer of skin biochemistry and an outstanding dermatologist, epitomize both the successes and frustrations of women scientists in academia in Germany in the first half of the twentieth century.

Elsa Neumann

A pioneer among women scientists in Germany, Elsa Neumann was the first woman to receive a doctoral degree at the University of Berlin (in 1899), nine years before women were officially allowed to study. She became a scholar and a pioneer in aviation research, participating in a flight in a Zeppelin airship in 1902.

Hilde Levi

Hilde Levi was an exceptional woman physicist who worked first in Germany and later in her new home country, Denmark, where she became a prominent researcher. She belonged to the second generation of women scientists in Germany, who were able to participate on a relatively equal basis in scientific institutions and in academia.

Gertrud Kornfeld

Gertrud Kornfeld’s life epitomises both the successes and frustrations of women scientists in academia in the first half of the twentieth century. She was the first woman scientist to receive an academic appointment in chemistry at the University of Berlin when she obtained the “venia legendi” to lecture in physical chemistry at the university (Privatdozent).

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Annette B. Vogt." (Viewed on September 19, 2019) <https://qa.jwa.org/encyclopedia/author/vogt-annette>.

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