Barbara Seaman

Barbara Seaman, was a women’s health advocate for more than forty years. She was the co-founder of the National Women’s Health Network, a women’s advocacy group in Washington, D.C., a national judge of the Project Censored Awards, and an advanced science writing fellow at Columbia University’s School of Journalism. She was the author of several books, including The Greatest Experiment Ever Performed on Women: Exploding the Estrogen Myth; The Doctors’ Case Against the Pill; For Women Only: Your Guide to Health Empowerment; Free and Female and Women and the Crisis in Sex Hormones. She contributed frequently to The New York Times, the Washington Post, Ms., Hadassah Magazine, Ladies’ Home Journal, Brides and Family Circle. Barbara Seaman passed away in 2008.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Barbara Seaman." (Viewed on November 14, 2019) <https://qa.jwa.org/encyclopedia/author/seaman-barbara>.

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