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Eva Martin Sartori

Eva Martin Sartori is professor emerita of Libraries at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With Dorothy W. Zimmerman she edited French Women Writers and was editor-in-chief of The Feminist Encyclopedia of French Literature. She has also published articles and edited books on Western European librarianship. She co-edited Daughters of Sarah: Jewish Women Writing in French with Madeleine Cottenet-Hage.

Articles by this author

Jacqueline Mesnil-Amar

Few testimonies to the plight of French Jews during and after World War II are as moving and as eloquent as those of Jacqueline Mesnil-Amar. Few writers describe so wrenchingly the drastic psychological and material schism that resulted from the Vichy government’s abandonment of its Jewish population during the Holocaust.

Clara Malraux

During her long and active life Clara Malraux was motivated principally by her feminist convictions and by her growing awareness of herself as a Jew. In her youth she struggled to escape the stifling role assigned to women of the bourgeoisie, to become a participant in life rather than a spectator. Her determination to create a meaningful and engaged life for herself caused her to reject the role of a conventional wife. After the failure of her attempt to forge an egalitarian marriage, she succeeded in making a life for herself by playing an active role in the French Resistance during World War II, going on to a successful career as a writer and activist after the war. In her middle years, her experiences during the war forced her to confront her identity as a Jew. In her essay on the German-Jewish intellectual and salonnière Rahel Levin Varnhagen, Malraux saw these two concerns as intimately linked. “Respect for women and respect for Jews go hand in hand,” she wrote. Born into the assimilated haute bourgeoisie, with little knowledge of Judaism and little identification with Jews, her experiences as a Jewish single mother of an ailing child during the war transformed her into a passionate defender of Israel often in conflict with other left-wing intellectuals.

Julienne Bloch

Julienne Bloch devoted her life to strengthening the commitment of French Jews both to Judaism as a religion and to their fellow Jews at home and abroad. As a journalist and an educator, she fought against the increasingly widespread assimilation, acculturation and secularization of the period following the emancipation of French Jews, and her writings paint a vivid picture of the tensions within the mid-nineteenth-century Franco-Jewish community. As one of the earliest published Jewish women writers in France she also contributed significantly to the creation of a public sphere for French Jewish women.

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Eva Martin Sartori." (Viewed on September 19, 2019) <https://qa.jwa.org/encyclopedia/author/sartori-eva>.

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