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Sandy Flitterman-Lewis

Sandy Flitterman-Lewis holds a doctorate in Comparative Literature from the University of California at Berkeley. She is an associate professor of English and Cinema Studies and a member of the Women’s and Gender Studies Graduate Faculty at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. She was a founding editor of both Camera Obscura: A Journal of Feminism and Film Theory and Discourse: Theoretical Studies in Media and Culture. Her research focuses on feminist theory, film theory and cultural studies, World War II and the Holocaust, French cinema and theories of national identity, and television and contemporary culture. She is the author of To Desire Differently: Feminism and the French Cinema and coauthor of New Vocabularies in Film Semiotics, as well as of numerous anthology chapters and journal articles. She has published a major study of Night and Fog, the documentary on Auschwitz by Alain Resnais and Jean Cayrol. Her current work is on a book, Hidden Voices: Essays on Childhood, the Family, and Antisemitism in Occupation France, which stems from a conference she organized at Columbia University about material culture and daily life during World War II.

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Marceline Loridan-Ivens

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Izieu, Women of

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Anouk Aimée

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Sandy Flitterman-Lewis." (Viewed on September 19, 2019) <https://qa.jwa.org/encyclopedia/author/flitterman-lewis-sandy>.

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