This website is made possible by generous donations from users like you. $18 helps keep JWA online for one day. Please consider making a gift before our June 30 fiscal year end. Thank you!

Close [x]

Show [+]

Patrizia Acobas

Patrizia Acobas is completing her master’s degree in Judeo-Romance Linguistics at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Articles by this author

Ada Ascarelli Sereni

Much of Ada Sereni’s life was spent in the shadow of the heroic figure of her husband Enzo, who died as one of the Jews who parachuted into German-occupied Europe during World War II, but she herself made so noteworthy a contribution to the Zionist enterprise as to win her the 1995 Israel Prize.

Margherita Sarfatti

Margherita Sarfatti was born in Venice on April 8, 1880, into the wealthy and cultured Jewish Grassini family. Sarfatti was educated by private tutors, among them Antonio Fradeletto (1858–1930), the founding director of the Venice Biennale. During her childhood, she began to be interested in art and poetry, influenced by Fradeletto, who introduced her to the theories of John Ruskin.

Elsa Morante

Elsa Morante was born in Rome on August 18, 1912, to Irma Poggibonsi from Emilia (near Modena), and a Sicilian father, Francesco Lo Monaco. In 1930 she began writing for the children’s journals Il Corriere dei Piccoli and I diritti della scuola, publishing her novelQualcuno bussa alla porta in installments in the latter in 1935.

Natalia Ginzburg

Arguably the most important woman writer of post-World War II Italy, Natalia Ginzburg was born on July 14, 1916 in Palermo (Sicily), where her Jewish Trieste-born father, Giuseppe Levi, who later achieved fame as a biologist and histologist, was at the time a lecturer in comparative anatomy. Modest and intensely reserved, Ginzburg never shied away from the traumas of history, whether writing about the Turin of her childhood, the Abruzzi countryside or contemporary Rome—all the while approaching those traumas only indirectly, through the mundane details and catastrophes of personal life.

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Patrizia Acobas." (Viewed on December 10, 2019) <https://qa.jwa.org/encyclopedia/author/acobas-patrizia>.

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

Get JWA in your inbox