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Eliana Light

Eliana Light has used her passion for music and Jewish education to engage children and adults in a relationship with the divine.

Dame Myra Hess

When the National Gallery closed during the London Blitz, Dame Myra Hess persuaded the gallery’s director to reopen for an immensely popular series of lunchtime classical concerts that gave the war-weary British an infusion of culture and beauty.

Clara Haskil

Despite constant pain from scoliosis and a tumor on her optic nerve, pianist Clara Haskil became renowned for the purity and delicacy of her interpretations of Mozart and other classical composers.

Rachel Bloom

Rachel Bloom has combined her passion for musical theater, her gift for comedy, her feminist sensibility, and her roots in Jewish humor to create the award-winning show Crazy Ex-Girlfriend.

Alicia Jo Rabins

With her indie rock song cycle Girls in Trouble, musician Alicia Jo Rabins has reinterpreted the women of the Bible for a modern audience.

Elizabeth Swados

One of the youngest playwrights ever to have a play produced on Broadway, Liz Swados was unafraid of tackling heavy subjects like politics, racism, and mental illness.

Yara Bernette

World-renowned pianist Yara Bernette reached the pinnacle of her career in 1972 when she was chosen from 130 candidates to head the piano program at the Hamburg Music and Performing Arts School.

Astrith Baltsan

Astrith Baltsan has used her strengths as a musician, director, and scholar to find unconventional and engaging ways to introduce classical music to new audiences.

Chava Alberstein

In her fifty-years as one of Israel’s most celebrated singer/songwriters, Chava Alberstein has run the gamut from recording pop hits to reviving Yiddish classics.

Hanne Blank

Both as a historian and as a fiction writer, Hanne Blank has questioned how we relate to our bodies and our sexuality, from gender norms to fat-shaming.

Fannie Bloomfield Zeisler

Praised for “Playing like a man,” Fannie Bloomfield Zeisler exploded notions about women pianists with the precision, power, and expressiveness of her performances.

Teresa Sterne

Teresa Sterne had two great careers in music, first as a child prodigy pianist, then as one of the first women record producers in the US.

Ruth Rubin

Ruth Rubin helped lay the cornerstones for the modern Yiddish revival movement by recording, studying, and performing Yiddish songs and folk tales.

Sylvia Rosner Rothchild

Sylvia Rosner Rothchild used her writing talents to turn oral history interviews with Holocaust survivors and Russian refuseniks into engaging accounts that challenged stereotypes and captured American mainstream audiences.

Nadia Reisenberg

A gifted pianist, Nadia Reisenberg used her talents to connect with others, from her acclaimed performances with her sister to her years of training musicians in New York and Jerusalem.

Adrienne Cooper

Adrienne Cooper played a critical role in the revival of Yiddish music as founder of the Yiddish Folk Arts Program (KlezKamp), a group that brought together musicians, linguists, and anthropologists to recover the tradition of Klezmer.

Ethel Stark

As founder of the Montreal Women’s Symphony Orchestra, Ethel Stark broke down barriers, becoming the first woman to conduct an orchestra at Carnegie Hall in 1947 and welcoming Violet Grant States as the first black woman member of a Canadian symphony orchestra.

Regina Spektor

With her surreal lyrics and experimental vocalizations, Regina Spektor carved a place for herself in the anti-folk music scene and went on to conquer the pop charts.

Margalit Oved

Dancer and choreographer Margalit Oved’s performances blended elements from many cultures, including the Yemen of her childhood, the Israel of her adolescence, and the Los Angeles of her adulthood.

Mary Moss

Despite living at home with her parents for much of her life, Mary Moss lived a vivid existence through the lives she investigated as a journalist and the ones she invented in her fiction.

Erica Morini

Violinist Erica Morini stunned audiences from her first performance at age five to her death, when the Strad newspaper mourned her as “the most bewitching woman violinist of this century.”

Hephzibah Menuhin

Hephzibah Menuhin had a stellar career as a pianist, but a visit to Theresienstadt in 1947 drew her to a new calling as a human rights activist.

Ruth Laredo

Ruth Meckler Laredo’s astonishing piano performances caused one New York Times reporter to write, “Her hands sometimes appear to hover over the keys, a blur to the eyes if not the ears…But what hummingbird ever packed such power?“

Tziporah H. Jochsberger

Having escaped the Holocaust on the strength of her musical talents, Tziporah H. Jochsberger went on to use music to instill Jewish pride in her students.

Ida Haendel

A musical prodigy who began playing at age three and performing at age four, Ida Haendel continued her passionate violin performances into her late eighties.
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