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Paula Jacques

Paula Jacques has been praised for writing novels that explore the flaws and longings of Egyptian Jews.

Rebecca Taichman

Rebecca Bayla Taichman’s success as the Tony award-winning director of Indecent is a reflection of her lifelong celebration of plays by and about women.

Rokhl Holzer

Rokhl Holzer earned a reputation as an actress with a talent for transforming herself to suit any role, but her most remarkable transformation may have been her shift from Poland to Australia’s Yiddish theater.

Michal Govrin

As the child of a Holocaust survivor, Michal Govrin has used her writing to open a broader conversation about the enduring legacy of the Holocaust.

Tavy Stone

Fashion writer Tavy Stone reached the pinnacle of her career when she was chosen as one of only seven American reporters allowed to cover the wedding of Lady Diana and Prince Charles.

Edis De Philippe

Cultural powerhouse Edis De Philippe founded the Israel National Opera Company in 1947, creating a landmark institution for the performing arts.

Shulamit Bat-Dori

Shulamit Bat-Dori defied widely held notions about the inappropriateness of theater in the kibbutz, creating popular and acclaimed plays for the masses.

Astrith Baltsan

Astrith Baltsan has used her strengths as a musician, director, and scholar to find unconventional and engaging ways to introduce classical music to new audiences.

Viola Spolin

Searching for play therapies that could reach at-risk children, Viola Spolin created the “Theater Games” that gave rise to improv theater.

Julie Taymor

Julie Taymor’s bold, experimental style in directing plays and films has led to two Tonys (including the first Best Director Tony won by a woman) and an Emmy.

Helen Tamiris

Acclaimed choreographer and director Helen Tamiris used dance to comment on the social issues of her day, including racism, poverty, and war.

Regina Resnik

Undaunted by changes to her voice, opera singer Regina Resnik reinvented herself multiple times in her career, taking on unexpected new roles.

Shirley Cohen Steinberg

Shirley Cohen Steinberg helped make the Jewish holidays fun and interactive for children with her Holiday Music Box albums, featuring “One Morning” (popularly known as the Passover “Frog Song”).

Martha Morton

Playwright Martha Morton created textured and challenging roles for women and earned over a million dollars for her work throughout her lifetime.

Adele Gutman Nathan

With a lifelong passion for both theater and history, Adele Gutman Nathan made a career of creating historical pageants, leading to her crowning achievement, writing a guide for Americans to celebrate their country’s bicentennial.

Meredith Monk

Meredith Monk’s avant-garde, mixed-media creations blend music, dance, film, and live performance to explore the collision of past and present, from the Black Plague to the AIDS crisis and from the medieval ghetto to Ellis Island.

Elaine May

Elaine May broke down barriers for women in comedy, first as half of the celebrated comic duo Nichols and May, then as one of the few women writer/directors in Hollywood.

Bella Lewitzky

Dancer and choreographer Bella Lewitzky was as famous off stage as on, thanks to her battles for freedom of expression against both the House Un-American Activities Committee and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Elma Ehrlich Levinger

Elma Ehrlich Levinger helped strengthen the Jewish community through her leadership of Jewish women’s organizations, but her books for children and adults may have had an even greater impact on American Jews.

Miriam Kressyn

Miriam Kressyn was that rare talent known as much for her performances as for her work offstage as a historian of the Yiddish theater.

Helen Joseph

Called the “grandmother of American puppetry“ for her definitive history of puppets and marionettes, Helen Haiman Joseph was also known for her own practice of the craft as a talented designer and director.

Rose Franken

Rose Lewin Franken challenged her audiences with fiction, films, and plays that turned their expectations on their heads.

Annabelle Gamson

Annabelle Gamson’s performances of Isadora Duncan’s choreography were remarkable both in their own right and for the fact that Gamson performed them in her forties, at an age when most dancers chose to retire.

Mary Jacqueline Fabian

Mary Jacqueline Fabian brought opera to those who might not otherwise hear it, from directing an opera company in Birmingham, Alabama to running education and enrichment programs for a quarter of a million children in postwar Europe.

Helen Abrahams Blum

Helen Abrahams Blum earned a reputation as a talented painter before discovering a passion for all aspects of theater, from set design to directing.
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