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Collection

Idra Novey

Through her poetry, translation, and fiction, Idra Novey relishes playing in the space between languages.

Malka Kolodny

Malka Fisz Kolodny served as one of the first teachers in pre-State Palestine, at a time when teaching often involved counseling traumatized war orphans.

Feiga Izrailevna Kogan

A prolific poet in her own right, Feiga Izrailevna Kogan used her deft translations of Hebrew literature to bring Jewish and Israeli culture to a Russian audience.

Rashel Mironovna Khin

Rashel Mironovna Khin hosted salons that made her the toast of Imperial Russia and, with the help of the novelist Ivan Turgenev, became a successful writer in her own right.

Claire Goll

Claire Goll’s poetry and prose were fueled by the tragedies and scandals that shaped her life.

Lea Goldberg

One of the great poets of modern Israeli literature, Lea Goldberg used the forms of Eastern European folk songs to capture the world lost in the Holocaust.

Rachel Ertel

Shaped by Yiddish culture from an early age, Rachel Ertel sparked a love of Jewish studies in others through her work as the most respected scholar of Yiddish in France.

Elisheva Bichovsky

As one of Palestine’s first Hebrew poets, Elisheva Bichovsky helped shape the emerging country’s new literary scene.

Ruby Daniel

Ruby Daniel’s memoir of her life in India revealed not only the rich culture of her childhood but also her experiences as a Jewish woman in the Indian Navy, serving alongside Muslim and Hindu men.

Ruth Bondy

Journalist Ruth Bondy made larger events more relatable for readers through her insightful human interest stories.

Lili Berger

Lili Berger’s experiences in the Holocaust heavily influenced her choices as a Yiddish writer and translator, focusing on the tensions outsiders face in different societies.

Katja Behrens

Part of the first generation of postwar writers in Germany, Katja Behrens grapples with the often difficult relationship between German Jews and the majority.

Fania Mindell

After co-founding America’s first birth control clinic with Margaret Sanger in 1916, Fania Mindell was arrested and convicted of breaking the Comstock Act for her efforts to make birth control available to women.

Rose Auslander

Confined to her bed and unable to write for a decade, the gifted poet Rose Ausländer dictated many of her works.

Martha Wolfenstein

In her brief career, Martha Wolfenstein was hailed as “the best Jewish sketch writer in America.”

Louise Waterman Wise

Louise Waterman Wise spent her career caring for Jewish refugees and lost souls of all kinds, from American orphans to Holocaust survivors.

Lore Segal

Lore Segal’s life, including her transformative experiences during WWII, became the basis for her award-winning novels and children’s books.

Ruth Rubin

Ruth Rubin helped lay the cornerstones for the modern Yiddish revival movement by recording, studying, and performing Yiddish songs and folk tales.

Sarah Reisen

Sarah Reisen was both a gifted Yiddish writer in her own right and a respected translator of great literature into Yiddish for children and adults.

Shulamith Nardi

Shulamith Nardi helped shape relations between Jews and gentiles in the fledgling State of Israel through her analysis of Jewish literature and her work as advisor on Diaspora affairs to four Israeli presidents.

Bertha Szold Levin

Bertha Szold Levin, the youngest sister of Henrietta Szold, served for sixteen years as the first woman member of the Baltimore City School Board and pushed for the inclusion of working women in Hadassah.

Lotta Levensohn

Lotta Levensohn helped found Hadassah and later played a pivotal role in the organization’s history as an independent organization for Zionist women.

Miriam Kressyn

Miriam Kressyn was that rare talent known as much for her performances as for her work offstage as a historian of the Yiddish theater.

Shirley Kaufman

Shirley Kaufman used her Jewish heritage to create evocative poetry, exploring biblical matriarchs, her own mother’s immigrant past, and the tensions of daily life in modern Israel.

Lyalya Kaufman

The daughter of the acclaimed writer Sholom Aleichem and the mother of celebrated novelist Bel Kaufman, Lyalya Kaufman was revered in her own right for her thousands of vignettes and short stories in Yiddish.
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