Content type
Collection

Carolivia Herron

Carolivia Herron draws on her experience as an African American Jewish woman living in Washington, D.C. to reimagine the traditional form of “the epic” through her writing.

Alice Shalvi

Alice Shalvi created opportunities for Israeli women and girls, offering Talmud study to Orthodox girls and spearheading legislative reforms for women’s employment.

Bracha Habas

One of the few women journalists to work in Israel before the founding of the state, Bracha Habas became beloved for her work as a writer and editor of children’s literature.

Gisele Freund

From her photographs of a rally in Berlin to her insightful portraits of Evita Perón, Gisèle Freund captured the people who shaped the early twentieth century.

Joani Blank

Sex-positive activist Joani Blank created one of the first woman-friendly sex stores in America, Good Vibrations, as well as sex toys like the Butterfly vibrator.

Debbie Stoller

Debbie Stoller has been hailed as a pioneer of “girlie feminism” for reviving interest in traditionally feminine activities like knitting through Bust and Stitch ‘n Bitch.

Rachel Sassoon Beer

Rachel Sassoon Beer rose to fame as owner and editor of both The Observer and The Sunday Times, making her the first woman to edit a national newspaper.

Toni Sender

Toni Sender’s wide-ranging quest to save the world led her from the union hall to the German Parliament (as a socialist) and finally to the UN.

Eva Schocken

As the daughter of Salman Schocken, founder of Schocken Books, Eva Schocken pushed the publishing company to the forefront of both education and women’s studies.

Dorothy Schiff

Dorothy Schiff led many lives, from debutante to social reformer, but she is best remembered as the publisher of the New York Post, the first woman to run a New York newspaper.

Sallyann Amdur Sack

Sallyann Amdur Sack has often been called the godmother of Jewish genealogy for creating the resources that have allowed Jews to research their heritage.

Laura Riding

Laura Riding was as known in literary circles for her tumultuous personal life as for her exceptional poetry, regularly changing her name to mark transformative moments in her life.

Jenette Kahn

Jenette Kahn rebranded National Periodical Publications as DC Comics, reviving the failing company as a proving ground for both experimental titles and reboots of iconic characters like Batman and Superman.

Florence Nightingale Levy

Florence Nightingale Levy founded important journals and led a multitude of institutions that would shape our national relationship to art.

Sylvia Herscher

Sylvia Kossovsky Herscher, self-declared matchmaker of the theater world, took pride in pairing writers, composers, producers, and publishers to create memorable scores and shows.

Tatyana Grosman

Tatyana Grosman helped make American printmaking a respected medium through Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE), the studio and publishing house she founded in 1957.

Jean Gordon

Already a successful businesswoman who had created a popular textile company, Jean Gordon launched a remarkable second career as the owner and publisher of Dance Magazine.

Ellen Frankel

The first woman to run a major Jewish publishing house, Ellen Frankel revived the faltering Jewish Publication Society, making it once again a vital publisher of popular Jewish scholarship.

Rosa Sonneschein

Rosa Sonneschein created the American Jewess, the first English-language magazine for Jewish women in the United States.

Amy Loveman

Amy Loveman’s passion for literature made her the ideal book review editor and led to her vital role in the Book-of-the-Month Club, selecting great books to introduce to new readers.

Blanche Wolf Knopf

Blanche W. Knopf made the publishing firm she shared with her husband one of the most respected in the world, bringing some of the greatest American and European thinkers of the twentieth century to an American audience.

Gladys Heldman

Gladys Heldman fought to ensure that women’s tennis was taken seriously and that women players competed for the same prize money as men.

Florence Howe

Florence Howe’s Feminist Press not only created a platform for modern feminist authors and scholars but helped the American public rediscover amazing women authors who had been long forgotten.

Gloria Greenfield

Disturbed by growing anti-Semitism in the women’s movement, Gloria Greenfield left the movement and began creating documentary films that brought national attention to anti-Semitism in America and around the world.

Emma Goldman

Emma Goldman’s controversial beliefs made her many powerful enemies, but their attempts to silence her ironically led to greater protections of free speech in America.
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