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Rochel Berman

Resisting taboos around discussing death, Rochel Udovich Berman has worked to educate people on Jewish funerary practices and encourage them to participate in the mitzvah of caring for the dead.

Henriette Furth

Despite facing ongoing anti-Semitism, journalist Henriette Katzenstein Fürth remained a passionate and vocal German patriot throughout her life.

Barbara Frum

Barbara Rosberg Frum earned a reputation as one of Canada’s all-time great journalists for her ability to gently pressure interviewees into revealing truths.

Adeline Moses Loeb

Adeline Moses Loeb died just a few months before the opening of the Central Park boathouse she had helped create.

Sandra Brown

A tireless leader of the Toronto Jewish community, Sandra Brown dedicated her volunteering career to improving Jewish schools.

Constance Amberg Sporborg

For Constance Amberg Sporborg, knowledge was power: she spent decades educating women about their choices, from immigrants at Ellis Island to voters at the ballot boxes.

Bertha Floersheim Rauh

A social reformer ahead of her time, Bertha Floersheim Rauh initiated dozens of vital services and completely overhauled Pittsburgh’s Department of Public Welfare.

Lucy Goldschmidt Moses

A lifelong New Yorker, Lucy Goldschmidt Moses used her wealth to improve the city she loved, from restoring Central Park’s iconic Bow Bridge to funding the city’s hospitals and medical schools.

Fania Marinoff

Fania Marinoff may have been an actress of stage and screen, but she was best known as a hostess whose home became a major hub for artistic circles in New York.

Edith Altschul Lehman

Both with her husband and in her own right, Edith Altschul Lehman funded endeavors from building schools in Israel to creating a children’s zoo in Central Park.

Linda Lavin

Linda Lavin won a Tony for her work in theater, but was best known for her Emmy-winning lead role in the television show Alice.

Aly Raisman

Alexandra “Aly” Raisman not only won gold and bronze medals for her individual performances at the 2012 Olympics but captained the women’s gymnastic team that won the gold medal that year.

Lucy Fox Robins Lang

Though her work was largely uncredited and behind the scenes, Lucy Fox Robins Lang contributed greatly to both the labor movement and the anarchist movement as aide and confidante to major figures like Emma Goldman and Samuel Gompers.

Sara Landau

Highly unusual for her time, Sara Landau not only made a name for herself as a respected economist, but paired her scholarship with inexhaustible volunteerism both in her community and through national organizations.

Marilyn Hirsh

Marilyn Hirch brought her knowledge as an art historian and Jewish scholar to her thoughtful illustration and writing of children’s books, including the beloved K’tonton series.

Florence Heller

An important benefactress of Brandeis University, Florence Grunsfeld Heller made her mark as one of the first women to run a general Jewish organization, the Jewish Welfare Board.

Ruth Bernard Fromenson

For twenty-five years, Ruth Bernard Fromenson worked with Hadassah to send supplies to Palestine, from clothes and medical supplies to toys for war orphans.

Miriam Freund-Rosenthal

Miriam Freund-Rosenthal brought her passion for art and history to her leadership of Hadassah, convincing the artist Marc Chagall to create stained glass windows for Hadassah’s medical center in Jerusalem and compiling a history of Hadassah for posterity.

Rose Gruening

Rose Gruening created a number of social assistance organizations to aid immigrant families, offering practical help that included childcare, funding for college educations, and even a summer camp.

Richea Gratz

Richea Gratz became the first Jewish woman to attend college in America in 1787, at the age of thirteen.

Bessie Goldstein Gotsfeld

Bessie Goldstein Gotsfeld helped organize American Mizrachi Women (now known as AMIT), pushed for its independence from men’s groups, and made aiding children in Israel a major goal of the organization.

Pauline Goldmark

Pauline Goldmark’s talents as a researcher made her indispensable to labor rights initiatives, from investigating the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire to helping lead Columbia University’s School of Social Work.

Jane Brass Fischel

Jane Brass Fischel created and led organizations to support Jews of all ages, from the Hebrew Children’s Home for orphans to the Home of the Daughters of Jacob, an elder care facility.

Doris Bauman Gold

Doris Bauman Gold founded Biblio Press to offer Jewish women a better sense of their history and to create a venue for authors of new feminist rituals and prayers.

Adele Ginzberg

Known as “Mama G.” and “Mrs. Seminary,” Adele Ginzberg helped her husband, Louis Ginzberg, create a warm atmosphere at the Jewish Theological Seminary and helped lay the groundwork for women’s greater inclusion in Conservative Judaism.
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