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Clara Immerwahr

As the wife of Fritz Haber, the father of chemical warfare, and a scientist in her own right, Dr. Clara Immerwahr made the ultimate protest of her husband’s work by committing suicide.

Rosalind Elsie Franklin

Although her work formed the basis for Watson and Crick’s discovery of DNA, Rosalind Franklin was denied credit for decades.

Yehudith Birk

Yehudith Birk’s investigations into the protein structures of legumes like soy and chickpeas led to vital discoveries about both the nutritional value of legumes and their potential for combatting certain cancers.

Ruth Arnon

Immunologist Ruth Arnon and her long-time collaborator Michael Sela made unprecedented breakthroughs when they developed the first synthetic antigen and the first drug approved for treating multiple sclerosis, Copaxone.

Ora Mendelsohn Rosen

Despite her tragically short career, Ora Mendelsohn Rosen’s biochemical research helped explain how hormones dictate cell growth, shaping our understanding of diabetes and cancer.

Berta Ottenstein

Despite repeatedly needing to restart her career when she fled from Nazi-held territories, Berta Ottenstein earned great respect for her pioneering research in the field of dermatology.

Joyce Jacobson Kaufman

Joyce Jacobson Kaufman’s groundbreaking work in chemistry and physics led to major advancements for the designs of compounds ranging from pharmacological drugs to rocket fuel.

Frances Krasnow

Frances Krasnow helped bring scientific rigor to dental medicine through her research into oral biochemistry and microorganisms.

Irene Caroline Diner Koenigsberger

Irene Caroline Diner Koenigsberger discovered the molecular structure of rubber but refused to patent her work, making her discovery available to all.

Rita Sapiro Finkler

Rita Sapiro Finkler was a pioneer in the field of endocrinology, making important discoveries about the role hormones play in pregnancy, menopause, and other aspects of women’s health.

Mildred Cohn

Biochemist Mildred Cohn used new technology to measure organic reactions in living cells.

May Brodbeck

May Brodbeck’s career in the sciences ran the gamut from teaching high school chemistry to exploring fundamental philosophical questions about the nature of human consciousness.

Maxine Singer

Maxine Singer helped shape the emerging field of genetics as a researcher, educator, and medical ethicist.

Elsa Neumann

Elsa Neumann earned a doctorate in physics from the University of Berlin in 1899, nine years before women were officially allowed to study there, becoming the university’s first woman graduate.

Gerty Theresa Cori

Gerty Cori’s work on carbohydrate metabolism, which changed our understanding of diabetes and other diseases, earned her the Nobel Prize for Medicine, making her the first American woman and third woman ever given the honor.

Gertrude Elion

Gertrude Elion revolutionized the ways drugs are developed and received the Nobel Prize in Medicine even though she never earned her PhD.
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